Agreements

Memorandum of understanding for the 2019-2020 BiodivERsA call on Biodiversity and Climate Change Versão em português

Established between the following Funding Organisations

FWF, Austria

BELSPO, Belgium

F.R.S.-FNRS, Belgium

FWO, Belgium

CONFAP, Brazil

FAPESP, Brazil (São Paulo)

BNSF, Bulgaria

TACR, Czech Republic

IFD, Denmark

ETAG, Estonia

AKA, Finland

ANR, France

GUA-REG, France

REU-REG, France

DFG, Germany

DLR-PT, Germany

GSRT, Greece

EPA, Ireland

MoEP, Israel

VIAA, Latvia

RCL, Lithuania

RCN, Norway

NCN, Poland

FCT, Portugal

FRCT, Portugal (Azores)

UEFISCDI, Romania

SAS, Slovakia

DST, South Africa

AEI, Spain

GOBCAN, Spain (Canary Islands)

FORMAS, Sweden

SNSF, Switzerland

MHESR, Tunisia

TAGEM, Turkey

Referred hereinafter as “the Participating Organisations”

Preamble

BiodivERsA is a network of national and regional Funding Organisations promoting pan-European research on biodiversity, ecosystem services and Nature-based Solutions, and offering innovative opportunities for the conservation and sustainable management of biodiversity.

Together, major Funding Organisations of BiodivERsA will implement a joint call for research proposals on biodiversity and climate change, which will promote the integration of natural sciences, social sciences and humanities, and stakeholder engagement in the research projects. This call will be launched in the context of the BiodivERsA Strategic Research and Innovation Agenda (SRIA) & the BiodivClim ERA-Net COFUND programme.

As part of the ERA-NET COFUND scheme, this call will be co-funded by the European Commission (EC). The EC is increasing the available research budget by providing additional funding to that made available by the EC-eligible national/regional Funding Organisations.

Through their national/regional budget and the use of the EC “top-up” funding for EC-eligible countries, the Participating Organisations will strive to maximize the number of high quality transnational research projects that can be funded through this call.

Glossary

Associated Countrie

Associated Countries are countries who signed an association agreement with the European Union and its Members. In Horizon 2020, legal entities from Associated Countries can participate under the same conditions as legal entities from the Member States. The list of Associated Countries is available here:

http://ec.europa.eu/research/participants/data/ref/h2020/
grants_manual/hi/3cpart/h2020-hi-list-ac_en.pdf

Call Secretariat

The Call Secretariat is established by one of the Participating Organisations’ Head Offices, which, for the entire period of the call, is entrusted by the Participating Organisations to prepare, publish, and manage the call in cooperation and consultation with the CSC.

Call Steering Committee (CSC)

The CSC practical implementation of the call. It is composed of one mandated representative from each Participating Organisation taking part in the call, who will be the reference point for the participation of his/her organisation in the development and implementation of the call.

According to Funding Organisation’s regulations, members of the CSC either can decide personally on the issues addressed or forward the decision taken or to be taken by his/her organisation to BiodivERsA.

Evaluation Committee (EvC)

The EvC is a committee of experts that reviews and ranks pre- and full proposals. The EvC meets to agree on a final evaluation and ranking of pre- and full proposals.

External reviewer

An external expert that provides a (remote) written peer review of a proposal.

Funding Organisation or Participating Organisation

A Funding Organisation or Participating Organisation is an Organisation participating in the 2019-2020 BiodivERsA call on “Biodiversity and Climate Change”, which requires signing the present Memorandum of Understanding.

Funding Organisation Contact Point (FCP)

A FCP represents a Participating Organisation and can be contacted by applicants and the Call Secretariat to give information on or explain the call procedures as well as national rules and procedures.

Partner

Depending on the Funding Organisation, a “Partner” is a researcher, an institution or an organisation, a laboratory, or a department of an institution and is contributing to the implementation of the research project.

Rapporteur

The rapporteurs for a given project are the members of the EvC to whom the project proposal has been allocated.

The Participating Organisations therefore agree as follows:

I. General objective

The purpose of this Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) is to establish the procedures for the 2019/2020 joint COFUND call under an international funding programme within the context of BiodivERsA and BiodivClim. The Participating Organisations agree to jointly define the topic, disseminate the call and establish the application, review and funding procedures.

The Participating Organisations’ objective will be to maximize the number of high quality transnational research projects that can be funded through this call.

This MoU is a mutual statement of intention among the Participating Organisations who agree to make every reasonable effort to fulfil the intentions herein.

II. Procedures

1. Funding Model

The Participating Organisations agree to launch a joint call and use a joint evaluation with national/regional funding and additional EC co-funding for EC-eligible Funding Organisations.

The grants for the funded research projects will be awarded on a national/regional basis by the relevant Funding Organisations and administered according to their terms and conditions, taking into account all other applicable regulations and legal frameworks, including – for EC-eligible Funding Organisations – the regulations of the European Commission.

The Participating Organisations agree to endeavour to fund as many of the highest ranked proposals as possible.

The EC top-up funding for each EC-eligible Participating Organisations shall be predominantly allocated according to the Participating Organisation’s respective actual financial contribution to the joint call.

The EC-eligible Participating Organisations agree to use the EC contribution for research as a “mix-mode” funding model composed of

- 80% pro rata actual spent, i.e. 80% of the EC contribution to support research will be allocated pro rata to the Funding Organisations, based on their respective actual contributions

- 20% "flexibility" common pot, i.e. 20% of the EC contribution will be put into a "flexibility" common pot that will be used to close the gaps of funding within the ranking list. National/regional Funding Organisations first have to fulfil their commitments indicated as Indicative budget (low) (see table in 1) Annex 1) before they are allowed to get money from the common pot.

The Call Steering Committee reserves the right to adjust the redistribution of EC funding between a virtual (pro-rata) and real common pot during the funding meeting, where agreed unanimously by the funding organisations eligible to EC funding.

This funding model and the different levels of flexibility that can be implemented to ensure that the highest number of research projects is funded are described in Annex 2.

2. Management of the call

The Participating Organisations agree on the creation of a joint Call Steering Committee (CSC) for this call. The CSC is composed of one mandated representative from each Participating Organisation. The CSC will be responsible for the practical implementation of the call.

Mandate of the Call Steering Committee (CSC).

The Call Steering Committee is composed of one mandated representative from each Participating Organisation taking part in the call.

In principle, the CSC will work by consensus. If consensus cannot be reached, the following voting procedure is foreseen:

- Each Funding Organisation one vote;

- Decisions will be taken upon a qualified majority of at least 70% of the votes.

The Call Steering Committee has the following mandate:

- Starts when the Call MoU is signed; ends when the final report of the last research project is approved;

- Appoints the Evaluation Committee (EvC), i.e. selects and decides on the members of the EvC (see Annex 12);

- Appoints the Chair and Vice-Chair of the EvC (Annex 12);

- Provides names of potential external reviewers to the Call Secretariat and EvC;

- Agree on the final eligibility of Partners for funding based on the Call and national/regional eligibility rules;

- Decides on the evaluation procedure to follow;

- Decides on which projects to invite to step 2, based on the evaluation made by the EvC;

- Decides on which projects to recommend for funding based on and not deviating from the list of ranked proposals established by the EvC;

- Recommends a start date and end date of the projects;

- Establishes a fall-back procedure in case of funding failure of one/several Participating Organisations;

- Assesses and approves the final reports of the funded projects.

The Call Secretariat Organisations leading the call, i.e. Agence Nationale de la Recherche (ANR), and will assist the CSC. The Call Secretariat will coordinate the smooth implementation of the call with involvement of staff from ANR, either electronically or physically. The mandate of the Call Secretariat is detailed in Annex 11.

In addition, each Participating Organisation will indicate a Funding Organisation Contact Point (FCP) whom the applicants can approach to enable an effective implementation of the call. This means taking into account and paying particular attention to Funding Organisations’ rules and eligibility criteria and the legal form of project leaders (natural person or institution). The FCPs will be coordinated by the Call Secretariat to avoid duplication of efforts. The Call Secretariat will provide a FAQ available on the BiodivERsA website.

3. Defining the topic and disseminating the call

The Participating Organisations intend to arrange a call for transnational research projects on the topic “Biodiversity and Climate Change” (Annex 1).

The call will be announced on 2nd BiodivERsA website (http://www.biodiversa.org/2019-call) and the participating Organisations’ respective websites. The call documents will be available on the BiodivERsA website.

4. Appointment of an independent observer

Within the framework of the co-funded joint call of Horizon 2020 ERA-NET COFUND Action, the European Commission requires that the Consortium appoints an external observer, who will follow the whole evaluation process and especially the final EvC meeting where the final ranking list is established. Based on his/her observations, the independent observer will produce a report for the EC.

The main purpose of the independent observer is to report on whether the evaluation process complied, as expected, with the rules that govern the EC COFUND calls. In particular, this concerns the manner in which the expert evaluators apply the evaluation criteria, the process of arriving at a fair and transparent consensus decision and the establishment of the final ranked list of proposals. The observer may also offer suggestions on how the procedure could be improved.

Guidelines for the independent observer, as well as their tasks throughout the call evaluation process are detailed in Annex 16.

5. Application procedure

The Participating Organisations agree on procedures, eligibility and proposal requirements, summarized below and specified in Annex 1.

- A two-step procedure for joint applications will be followed, consisting of the submission of pre-proposals at step 1 and full proposals at step 2.

- The submission of pre-proposal is compulsory. Applicants cannot submit a proposal at a later stage otherwise.

- The language of the call and applications is English.

- The eligibility of research Partners will be checked according to the Funding Organisations’ criteria (see Funding Organisations’ rules). The Call Secretariat cannot be held responsible for ineligibility decision taken by another Funding Organisations with regard to its own rules.

- The eligibility of budget items will be checked according to Funding Organisations’ rules.

- For projects willing to include Partners beyond the ones eligible for Participating Organisations: these Partners may take part in the project

· either if they are subcontracted, which should be made clear, and remain subject to the terms and conditions of each Funding Organisation;

· or if they are self-financed. In the latter case, it should be clearly indicated how their participation to the project will be funded and self-funded Partners will have to provide a letter of support to the Call Secretariat.

- The information given in the pre-proposals is binding. No changes regarding the proposals’ content will be allowed by the CSC between the pre-proposals and full proposals. Regarding the administrative details, a limited number of changes may be allowed by the FCP and CSC, provided they are in line with the general rules of the call and the rules of the Funding Organisations:

  • Minor change of budget can be allowed by the relevant Funding Organisation . The Funding Organisation can decide according to its own rules whether it needs a justification for it. If the national/regional Funding Organisation agrees to the budget change, the project coordinator has to inform the Call Secretariat about the change with the Funding Organisation Contact Point (FCP) in copy.

  • No changes of Partners are allowed between the pre-proposals and full proposal stages, except if explicitly requested by the Funding Organisations or in case of force majeure. In both cases, a detailed justification of the changes will have to be communicated to the Call Secretariat and CSC by the project coordinator as soon as possible. Please note that the following actions are considered as changes: addition, removal or replacement of a Partner. If a researcher in charge (person) remains the same but changes the institutions, this won’t be considered as a change, provided the institution fulfils eligibility criteria. Individual cases will be examined.

- The project must be transnational project involving eligible Partners from at least three different countries participating in the call and requesting support from at least three different Participating Organisations. In addition, part of the eligible Partners, at least two must be from different EU Member States or Associated Countries [1] participating in the call. Provided the latter criterion is met (Partners from at least two different EU Member States or Associated Countries participating in the call), for proposals including Partners from outermost regions and overseas countries and territories participating in the call, if two outermost regions and overseas countries and territories are from the same country, these are counted as two participating countries (for the criteria: at least three different countries). Where a proposal includes three or more Partners from outermost regions and overseas countries and territories from the same country, these will be counted as two participating countries (for the criteria: at least three different countries).

- The maximum project duration is 3 years.

6. Review and evaluation procedure

The CSC shall establish an EvC, comprising both scientific experts from natural, climate and social sciences and policy/management experts.

The CSC will appoint an EvC Chair and Vice-Chair from the EvC members. The EvC will be chaired by a scientific expert and co-chaired by a policy/management expert.

A two-step evaluation process will be organised:

(i) STEP 1: it will consist of an eligibility check of pre-proposals by the Call Secretariat and FCPs and an evaluation of pre-proposals by members of the EvC against the following criteria: fit to the scope of the call, novelty of the research and transnational added value (Annex 7). The CSC will decide on the number of projects to be invited to step 2, based on the list made by the members of the Evaluation Committee and their explanations. Consortia that should not be invited to step 2 receive a clear indication that based on their pre-proposal, their chance of being successful with a full-proposal is very low in this high-competitive call. However, this is only a recommendation, a full proposal cannot be formally rejected, solely because the consortium did not receive an invitation to step 2. The CSC will make sure to invite enough pre-proposals to step 2, to ensure that the funding rate at step 2 won’t exceed 30%.

(ii) STEP 2: it will consist of an eligibility check of full proposals by the Call Secretariat and FCPs and an evaluation of full proposals by the EvC and external reviewers. Each proposal should be preferably reviewed by two external scientific reviewers and one external societal reviewer. External reviewers are suggested by the CSC and EvC, with the support of the Call Secretariat, and with a particular support of the Chair and Vice-Chair. If necessary, the Call Secretariat will identify additional reviewers. In case of an insufficient number of reviews, the Call Secretariat is in charge of identifying experts, with the agreement of the given proposal’s rapporteurs in the EvC. If the proposal’s rapporteurs do not respond within 24 hours, the Call Secretariat can use the identified experts. If in spite of all efforts, the targeted numbers of external reviews cannot be reached for a significant number of proposals, the CSC will meet to decide how to handle this situation. The solutions would however have to meet the terms and conditions of each Funding Organisation. The EvC will convene to evaluate and make the final ranking of the submitted full proposals according to the following assessment criteria: (scientific) excellence, quality and efficiency of the implementation and impact; and moderating the reviews obtained. The final ranking list will be communicated to the CSC for final funding decision. Selection criteria are specified in Annex 7 and the details on the procedure are specified in Annexes 11 and 12.

Anticipated time schedule

June 2019:

Pre-announcement of the call

2 September 2019:

Official launch of the call

10 September 2019:

CSC meeting to appoint the chair and vice-chair

5 November 2019, 16:00 CET (local time in Brussels):

Deadline for submitting pre-proposal

21 November 2019:

Eligibility check completed by the Call Secretariat and FCP

26 November 2019:

CSC meeting agree on the final eligibility decision to be sent to applicants and to appoint the EvC

Late January / early February 2020

1st EvC meeting

> Results of the first EvC meeting

13 February 2020

CSC meeting to agree on proposals invited in Step 2

> proposals (max.14/02)

10 April 2020, 16:00 CEST (local time in Brussels):

Deadline for submitting full proposals

28 April 2020:

Second quick eligibility check completed by the Call Secretariat and FCPs

30 April 2020:

CSC meeting to agree on the final eligibility decision to be sent to applicants

Late June/early July 2020:

EvC meeting

> Ranked list of proposals established by the EvC

Mid-Late September 2020:

Recommendation for funding projects by the CSC

1 December 2020

Earliest possible start of funded projects

1 April 2021:

Latest possible start of funded projects

Evaluation costs

The EvC should meet three times:

- Once for the evaluation of the pre-proposals submitted in the 1st step

- Once (either physically or electronically) for the allocation of proposals amongst rapporteurs after the submission of the full proposals;

- And once for the evaluation and ranking of full proposals.

Each EvC member will receive a fee for his/her participation to the evaluation process that is fixed to a standard rate of 450 EUR if he/she participates to only one step of the evaluation process (either evaluation of pre-proposals only, or evaluation of full proposals only) and 900 EUR if he/she participates in both step (i.e. evaluation of both pre-proposals and full proposals). The Chair and Vice-Chair will receive a fee for his/her participation to the evaluation process that is fixed at a standard rate of 1,500 and 1,250 EUR respectively. These rates are net of any taxes (however, social charges apply).

In addition, travel costs, accommodation and meals for attending the EvC meetings will be covered.

Anonymity of EvC members and external reviewers

EvC members and External reviewers remain anonymous throughout the whole evaluation process, except to EvC members and to the Funding Organisations participating in the call. Information on the EvC and the CSC members who have suggested the names of reviewers will be maintained in strict confidentiality by the Call Secretariat during and after the completion of the entire evaluation process.

The composition of the EvC will be made public only after the CSC has made its final decision about which projects are recommended for funding (without indication as to which members evaluated which proposal). The names of external reviewers won’t be made public, even after the completion of the evaluation process.

Conflict of interest/good scientific practice

The Participating Organisations agree to use their best endeavours to avoid conflicts of interest and to safeguard good scientific practice. The Guidelines (Annex 10) apply to the CSC, EvC and external reviewers.

7. Final funding decision (at step 2)

The CSC decides on which projects to recommend for funding while strictly adhering to the order of the ranking list established by the EvC, taking into consideration that around the threshold some proposals considered of equal quality might be ranked ex-aequo by the EvC.

The Participating Organisations are aiming to fund as many of the highest ranked proposals as possible, following the funding model presented in Annex 2. Formal funding decisions are made by the Funding Organisations.

The Call Secretariat will notify the applicants of the results of the evaluation process. No oral or written information will be given by the Participating Organisations before the notification by the Call Secretariat.

After communication of the results, selected applicants will enter into the administrative process with their corresponding regional/national Funding Organisations. Participating Organisations will coordinate the establishment of contracts with their respective funded teams.

8. Funding procedure

- Funding of selected projects should start during the period 1 December 2020 – 1 April 2021, using 2020 and/or 2021 budget;

- Research Partners of successful project consortia will be funded directly by their respective Funding Organisations and funding will be administered according to the regulations of the respective national/regional Funding Organisations. In addition, the EC funding for the projects will be distributed through the national/regional Funding Organisations;

- Funding Organisations’ procedures for joint programme funding will be made explicit to the Call Secretariat, Steering Committee and applicants in order to avoid any unexpected delays or issues.

9. Monitoring and evaluation / dissemination of results

Funded projects are required to provide a mid-term report (ca. 18 months) and a final report (ca. 36 months) on research progress and financial aspects.

In addition, the administrative rules of the relevant Funding Organisation apply.

The mid-term and final reports will allow the Funding Organisations to evaluate the implementation status of the research according to the initial work plan. The mid-term reports will be sent to the CSC for information and discussion, while the final reports will be sent to the CSC for assessment.

Funded projects are required to participate in activities that allow networking between the projects and the dissemination of the projects’ results. This includes:

- a kick-off meeting at the beginning of the funding period that will be organised back-to-back with a data management workshop and a clustering workshop and

- a final meeting, to be organised back-to-back a foresight workshop, to present and disseminate the project result.

Applicants should include the costs for their participation in these meetings in the budget of their proposals.

Note that in their data management plans, the projects funded will be strongly encouraged to make available publicly the new databases, with metadata, they will have produced.

The dissemination of the project outputs is the responsibility of the funded projects. Plans for dissemination of the results shall form part of the proposals and are included in the evaluation procedure.

In addition, BiodivERsA will help selected projects make use of relevant knowledge transfer platforms (e.g. IPBES, Oppla, MAES, BISE, GBIF, etc.) and can also further disseminate key results of projects (e.g. through policy briefs, see: https://www.biodiversa.org/).

III. Duration of the Memorandum of Understanding

This Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) shall be effective as of the date of the last signature and shall remain in force until the last final project report is approved. This MoU may be amended or modified by consensus by mutual written agreement of the signatories or their replacements.

We, the undersigned, do hereby agree to the terms and conditions specified in this Memorandum of Understanding including:

IV. Signatures

1) Annex 1: Announcement of Opportunit (volta ao índice)

The Funding Organisations in the BiodivERsA network

have joined efforts to organize and fund a

International call for transnational research proposals on

“Biodiversity and Climate Change”

Introduction

BiodivERsA is a network of 39 organisations from 24 European countries programming and funding excellent research in the field of biodiversity, ecosystem services and Nature-based Solutions (www.biodiversa.org). BiodivERsA Partners aim to develop a long-lasting collaboration in research programming and funding policy and practice, thereby creating added value in high quality biodiversity research across national boundaries. One objective of BiodivERsA is to organise a Pan-European research programme for research on biodiversity, ecosystem services and nature-based solutions (http://www.biodiversa.org/1226).

34 Funding Organisations (including 27 BiodivERsA Funding Organisations and 7 other national/regional Funding Organisations) are contributing to the funding of the present BiodivERsA joint call for research projects to be co-funded by the European Commission part of the BiodivClim ERA-NET COFUND Action (see the updated list on http://www.biodiversa.org/2019-call).

(1) Context

Globally agreed priorities for the next decade have been expressed in the seventeen United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) [2] . These include two goals explicitly linked to biodiversity and the value of nature to society (i.e. Goal 14, Life below water, and Goal 15, Life on Land), as well as Goal 13, which focuses on climate action and refers to the key role of the UNFCCC and Paris Agreement process. Initial work has revealed that the 17 goals are intimately connected with one another [3] such that it will be difficult and undesirable to achieve any one of them without simultaneously considering the others [4] . The link is in some cases synergistic, meaning that addressing one goal will at the same time advance progress on another goal or make such achievements easier or more robust. In other cases, there are tensions and trade-offs between goals; here, the single-minded pursuit of one goal may undermine the possibilities of progress on another. Actions to achieve the SDGs should, as far as possible, be designed and implemented in an integrated manner. This is particularly important in cases where interactions are very strong, such as for challenges related to climate change and biodiversity, as also stressed in the recent IPBES Global Assessment report [5] .

Connections between biodiversity and climate change are now recognised as being of vital importance. On one hand, the Aichi target 15 of the Convention on Biological Diversity states that improving biodiversity status can greatly help to enhance ecosystem resilience and the contributions biodiversity can make towards climate change mitigation and adaptation [6] . On the other hand, climate change affects other biodiversity pressures [7] , highlighting the importance of considering interactions between direct and indirect drivers of biodiversity and of climate change [8] . These interactions are strong, bi-directional, and often - but not always - positive (i.e. actions in favour of addressing one are also beneficial to the other). For instance, the recent IPCC report on global warming of 1.5°C highlighted the synergies and trade-offs between actions that are often envisaged to tackle climate change-related threats to biodiversity loss. The recent IPBES global assessment [9] , the assessment on Land Degradation and Restoration Assessment [10] and IPCC Special Report on warming of 1.5°C [11] also showed the considerable demands that may be placed on biodiversity due to both mitigation and/or adaptation actions to address the causes and consequences of climate change. While the main pressures on terrestrial biodiversity are currently habitat loss and degradation and the main drivers of biodiversity loss in the aquatic domain are overharvesting, pollution and habitat degradation [12] , drivers such as human population growth, urbanisation, land use change, consumption life style and resource exploitation present key threats to biodiversity as a whole and some of these drivers can be directly or indirectly associated with climate change [13] .

Climate-induced biodiversity changes have also subsequent effects on a range of ecosystem functions and services - and more generally nature’s contributions to people - from the local to global scales [14] . This includes impacts on the processes by which ecosystems help to regulate the climate (e.g. regulation of greenhouse gas emissions) as well as diminishing valued landscapes and challenging long-held belief systems related to nature and stewardship. Feedback processes involving biodiversity and ecosystems may in turn amplify or diminish the effect of climate change, while societal responses to changing biodiversity and natural systems may shape the possible range of actions and approaches to biodiversity conservation and climate change [15] . Such feedback processes may also act through feedbacks of altered biodiversity status and ecosystem services on climate change drivers.

This growing understanding of the intricate relationships and feedback processes between climate change and biodiversity shows that our capacity to avoid approaching or overstepping these two planetary boundaries [16] , [17] requires that both aspects are considered in a holistic way. Addressing the impacts of climate change on biodiversity and feedbacks on climate requires integrative knowledge and new ways of thinking. Necessary approaches should not only identify challenges, but also lead to the actions and solutions that are needed to better preserve biodiversity, regulate climate and reinforce the resilience of socio-ecological systems. Such research could greatly contribute to the implementation of the post-2020 global biodiversity framework [18] and the Paris Agreement.

The tight coupling between climate, ecological processes and biological diversity offers important opportunities. Indeed, many studies have shown that actions nurturing diverse living organisms and their interactions and making ecosystem processes more resilient may be among the lowest-cost, least-regret and most rapidly-deployable ways of limiting global temperature rise to below the Paris Accord target [19] . Further, there are promising signs that in many circumstances, nature-based solutions (NbS [20] , [21] , [22] ) have the potential to act as a cost-effective and sustainable approach to climate change mitigation along with adaptation of (socio-)ecological systems and land/sea-scapes to climate change, while providing wider sustainability benefits to people. In some cases, however, working with nature to mitigate or adapt to climate change can have detrimental and unintended or unanticipated consequences for biodiversity (e.g. widespread afforestation or planting of bioenergy crops) and consequently for the ecosystem processes underpinning the delivery of ecosystem services. It is therefore imperative that the interactions between biodiversity and climate change are understood with sufficient detail and confidence so they can be incorporated into decision-support models and tools – ranging from global earth system models to local best-practice guidelines. Such approaches should consider the role that climate change has on biodiversity and vice versa, the potential of nature-based solutions for climate change mitigation greenhouse gas emissions while conserving and expanding carbon sinks) and for climate change adaptation (the maintenance of ecosystem services that are necessary for good quality of human life and for reducing the impact of anticipated negative effects of climate change). In this way it may be possible to plot pathways which address these two great issues of our time, while improving human well-being [23] .

(2) Priorities of the call

This call aims to support transnational research projects jointly addressing issues at the interface between biodiversity and climate change, and across a range of spatial and temporal scales in order to advance knowledge and support evidence-based and reflected decision-making. Projects addressing only biodiversity issues or only climate change issues will not be considered within the scope of the call.

Broad definitions of climate and biodiversity changes are considered for this BiodivERsA-EC COFUND programme. Applications should consider one or more of the different facets of biodiversity (i.e. changes in the different levels of biological diversity [24] ) and their drivers. Applications should also consider one or more of the multiple components of climate change (including changing atmospheric composition and changes in the mean, variability and extremes of many relevant climate variables) and its drivers. This implies to account as needed for the social, political, economic and/or cultural phenomena directly and indirectly underlying these biological and biophysical changes.

Projects may cover a broad range of methodological approaches (experimentation, data analysis from observations and monitoring [25] , modelling, scenarios, quantitative and qualitative social science methods [26] , participatory processes, or a combination of these). Preference will be given to projects that will seek to inform strategy and actions contributing to the achievement of major international policy goals (e.g. CBD Aichi targets, post-2020 global biodiversity agenda, UNFCCC Paris Agreement goals, UNCCD land degradation neutrality, UN Sustainable Development Goals) and regional policy goals (in particular EU policies). Applicants should consider how the knowledge they will produce can be scaled up or generalized beyond the studied location(s), disseminated in outreach actions and if possible embedded in order to maximize expected societal impact. Research projects should also look to provide information that will inform policy makers, authorities, institutions and practitioners concerned with decision-making, planning, designing and managing a broad range of environments and outreach to society.

The intention of this BiodivERsA programme co-funded by the European Commission is to support research projects in which the approaches and skills of natural sciences, social sciences and humanities are integrated as needed to address the specific objectives of each research proposal.

This programme also aims at funding transdisciplinary research projects demonstrating potential societal and policy impact. In this context, the participation of stakeholders (including private stakeholders) in research proposals is welcome.

This programme covers both continental and insular areas. Research on insular systems such as those of the Outermost Regions (ORs) and Overseas Countries and Territories (OCTs) will be of particular interest [27] .

Research under this COFUND call will focus on the four following themes:

- Consequences of climate change on biodiversity and nature’s contributions to people

- Climate-biodiversity feedback processes

- Potential of nature-based solutions for mitigating and adapting to climate change

- Synergies and trade-offs between policies on biodiversity, climate and other relevant sectors, and the role of agents of change

All environments can be considered, i.e. marine, freshwater and terrestrial –including urban.

Projects can address one theme or more. Projects combining aspects from two or more of the following themes are encouraged.

Theme #1: Consequences of climate change on biodiversity and nature’s contributions to people

Studies within this theme should address the individual/combined effects of multiple components of climate change on genetic, species, structural, functional and/or ecosystem diversity and the induced effects on nature’s contributions to people at relevant spatial and temporal scales. The climate drivers of biodiversity change should be understood as both rather direct, biophysical drivers (changing climate conditions) and more indirect, social/political/economic/cultural drivers linked to climate change. Research on the cascading effects of climate change on biodiversity, ecosystem functioning and services will be highly welcomed.

In particular, we wish to improve the capacity to forecast biodiversity responses to ongoing and/or projected climate change and impacts, both in scope and confidence. As an example, how will species distributions be modified with climate change, considering important processes like dispersal, migration, biotic interactions and adaptation capacity of organisms [28] , as well as the role of changed climatic variability? What is the sensitivity of different diversity facets (taxonomic, genetic, functional, structural, etc.) to climate change? How will climate change alter trophic webs and species assemblages? To what extent will species conservation statuses be altered by climate change (and with what implications for nature conservation approaches and actions in terms of, e.g., operative conservation units, in situ conservation strategies, reintroduction, reinforcement and/or translocation protocols) and what are possible comprehensive adaptation measures to prevent species loss and habitat changes? To what extent continental and insular biodiversity responses to climate change will differ considering, e.g., sea level rise, drought, extreme events? Will introduced species become invasive under an altered climate, how will societal responses to climate change affect these dynamics, and what will the implications for native species and habitats be? How will climate change modify species migrations? Research could support the development of early-warning indicators and observation systems to monitor and respond to accelerating future climate-driven biodiversity change and loss. Evaluation of vulnerability of species and habitats and analysis of the relationship between biodiversity change and climate change in relation to other factors such as land use patterns (agriculture, forestry, fisheries and water management, construction, mining of raw materials), fragmentation and habitat loss would also be welcomed.

In relation to the societal impact of climate change-altered biodiversity, relevant issues include: Will different ecosystem services and other related benefits be increased, decreased or become more vulnerable [29] ? What will the impacts of these changes be in terms of the (re)distribution of benefits across society, and particularly regarding already disadvantaged groups [30] ? More broadly, research analysing how social, political, economic and cultural responses to climate change – for example in terms of shifting values for nature, changing consumption practices, emerging forms of environmental behaviour [31] , or changing forms of economic production - may lead to impacts on biodiversity will be highly welcomed.

Research should account for the extent and speed at which climate change will impact biodiversity (both above and below the ground) and associated ecosystem services across regions and under different conditions/projections. It should also evaluate the thresholds of climate change above which biodiversity will be irreversibly changed and after which ecosystems will no longer function and deliver services in their current form (i.e. identification of tipping points) or which will lead to the loss of culturally important places with low degree of human intervention.

It is expected that research projects will clarify the relative importance for biodiversity of climate change in relation to other major drivers, like habitat loss or change, pollution, change in land/sea use including agriculture and fisheries, and underlying drivers of environmental degradation like consumption, modes of production, uneven development, and urbanisation. Research on how such pressures combined with climate change will affect biodiversity and the consequent changes in nature’s contributions to people will be welcomed.

Theme #2: Climate-biodiversity feedback processes

Research addressing theme 2 will focus on the feedbacks of biodiversity change to climate, e.g., consequences of major modifications or loss of biodiversity on biophysical fluxes, biogeochemical cycles, and biogenic greenhouse gas emissions and removals in the Earth system (terrestrial and marine), with demonstrated effects on climate change. It will also encompass research seeking to understand how societal responses to biodiversity change (e.g. biodiversity status in food production, exploitation of biodiversity in land and ocean, changing values for nature and its conservation, set up of green bound or green taxes, shifting practices of consumption in relation to biodiversity) may have consequences for both the climate system and for the ways in which societal actors are (and are not) able to undertake effective mitigation of and adaptation to climate change.

Quantifying the feedback of biodiversity change on the climate system is often more difficult than analysing the impact of climate change on biodiversity dynamics and ecosystem processes. This is because the latter can be manipulated experimentally at local scales or studied in plot networks along climate gradients, while feedback to the climate system not only operates at the local scale but also emerges at the regional to global scales. Analysing climate feedbacks thus requires a range of approaches including the analysis of regional to global data, e.g., from remote-sensing to socio-ecological models representing biodiversity and qualitative studies of socio-cultural changes related to biodiversity change

Research may address the following questions: To what extent may changes in biodiversity and ecosystem functioning induced by climate change plus other global change factors buffer or reinforce climate change? What are the direct and indirect effects of biodiversity on the climate system? How can remote-sensing data be used to detect both changes in biodiversity and changes in the energy balance, carbon cycle and water balance influencing climate change? What are the social, governance, cultural and economic processes underlying the feedbacks of biodiversity change onto climate change? What role can human behaviours directly related to biodiversity have on the drivers of and responses to climate change (e.g. how might social protests over the loss of nature or conservation efforts also serve to keep key fossil fuel reserves in the ground)?

Theme #3: Potential of nature-based solutions for mitigating and adapting to climate change

Projects will analyse the potential for and effectiveness of nature-based solutions (NbS [32] ) for climate change mitigation and adaptation along with other environmental, economic and social benefits, while preserving or strengthening biodiversity. This includes the qualitative and quantitative assessment of NbS’s multiple benefits as compared to conventional grey/purely technological solutions and their cost-effectiveness. Relevant NbS in this context encompass, e.g., the use and management of an increased agrobiodiversity for more sustainable food supply systems in the face of climate change and for agrosystems promoting carbon sequestration and reducing greenhouse gas emissions; the development of forests with diverse and native tree species that can better cope with climate change; the preservation of coastal ecosystems –including mangroves– with low degree of human intervention helpful to mitigate and adapt to climate change and reduce associated disaster risks; the sustainable management of seagrass habitats or coral systems as CO2 suppliers; and more generally the promotion of nature to tackle issues linked to climate change while delivering societal benefits like improved wellbeing and quality of life or alternative employment in urban, peri-urban, rural and coastal areas.

While research on NbS is growing, it tends to focus on single interventions, sites or scales in the analysis of their benefits, limitations and potential. Research under this call could increase the understanding of the interaction between different kinds of NbS over different scales to enhance the delivery of multiple benefits and their assessment. This would explore, for instance: What are the landscape-wide effects of climate relevant NbS? What are the cumulated effects of the implementation of different NbS in a given territory? Under which circumstances can NbS enhance the efficiency and effectiveness of climate change adaptation and mitigation, while benefiting biodiversity and wider societal goals? How are the benefits and trade-offs in different NbS generated and distributed across space and time (e.g. which people/social actors/groups will benefit from NbS)? To what degree can NbS address relevant goals (e.g. SDGs) for different communities and stakeholders? Such research would also help reveal the potential as well as possible limitations of NbS to address these challenges.

Research may also evaluate social, technical, economic, cultural and political levers and obstacles to implementation of NbS to tackling the climate change challenge. Projects studying how local/national/regional authorities and stakeholders (e.g. national agencies and governments, municipal governments, regional authorities, utilities, insurance companies, urban development industry, financing sector, community groups etc.) can design, implement and manage NbS strategies to enable benefits for climate change and biodiversity will be welcomed.

Theme #4: Synergies and trade-offs between policies on biodiversity, climate and other relevant sectors, and the role of agents of change

Under this theme, research will assess the synergies and trade-offs between policies and strategies developed for (i) the preservation and restoration of biodiversity and related ecosystem services, (ii) climate change mitigation including future requirements for negative emissions and adaptation and development of the resilience of natural and managed socio-ecological systems, and (iii) tackling other key societal challenges like food and fibre supply and energy supply, poverty alleviation, alternative employment opportunities, and social equity. Research may also consider the actions of multiple ‘agents of change’ (e.g. private corporations, investors, cities, communities) that are taking action on biodiversity and climate change to understand the impacts and consequences of this kind of action for biodiversity/climate change.

Research could address questions concerning structure, agency, politics and power that shape policy and governance processes related to biodiversity changes and their direct and indirect drivers. This could include the interactions between biodiversity policies/strategies (e.g. for protected areas, genetic resources, requirements for urban development), land-based climate mitigation policies/strategies (e.g., bioenergy, reforestation, increase in soil carbon), a wide range of adaptation policies/strategies (e.g., sea walls, flood control infrastructure), policies/strategies to develop renewable energies (e.g., wind, solar and hydro-power), agricultural/fisheries/aquaculture policies, as well as policies and strategies focusing on infrastructure development (housing, transport and utility provision), food security and health.

Studies will be welcomed which analyse how synergies and trade-offs between these different policies/strategies may be better taken into account in approaches, methods and policies used for nature protection (including the identification of areas to be protected), and how these approaches, methods and policies should change in the future due to climate change [33] .

Research should study how integrated policy approaches and multilevel governance dynamics and processes can deliver multiple benefits in parallel, not least helping to improve biodiversity status and the mitigation of and adaptation to climate change. How can such integrated and holistic systems be designed, operationalized and promoted at international, regional, national and/or local scale? How can these systems and approaches contribute more effectively achieving the SDGs? What unintended consequences must be avoided and what are strategies to do so?

(3) Expected international added value

The richness and specificities in various places and regions mean that it is necessary to understand the details of local biodiversity, ecosystems and socio-cultural conditions if we are to develop a robust framework for action, since much of the decisions should be made at and relate to sub-global scales. However, research to be funded through this BiodivERsA programme supported by the European Commission will have to go beyond single study cases. The physical, biological and social processes associated with biodiversity loss and climate change both take place at a range of spatial scales, ranging from the local to regional and global. Therefore, a sufficient understanding of the spread and connection of these processes cannot be revealed by research at a single scale, but rather relies on studies at multiple scales. These in turn need to take explicit account of the ways in which processes at one scale drive or constrain processes at one or more other scales. Similarly, both biodiversity and climate phenomena contain unique details that are specific to a given location, but also include generalities that apply across many places. A robust understanding of biodiversity-climate change interactions is thus most efficiently and effectively developed through transnational collaboration. In addition, the contemporary situation of vast regional interactions/teleconnections often requires to take into account the global context.

In term of methods, transnational collaboration in model development and the inter-comparison of different models is a logical way to advance research on biodiversity-climate interactions. Further, the sharing of observations, experimental outcomes and case studies is a key approach to developing resilience to climate change of socio-ecological systems. Learning and information sharing is key to social adaptation. Therefore, all project participants will benefit from a collaborative approach to the problem; which by its nature has many international-scale elements.

As usual, it is expected that applicants will ensure that their work has clear novelty and adds to the existing knowledge base, including regarding previously funded, ongoing projects.

Overlap with on-going international, European and national projects on this theme should thus be avoided. Complementing on-going research is however possible but should be clearly explained.

Applicants are encouraged to use existing resources and infrastructures for their project, including the data and information from the Copernicus programme - the European Union's Earth Observation Programme, the existing biodiversity research infrastructures, listed in the BiodivERsA mapping of biodiversity research infrastructures [CB1] , etc.

(4) Procedures, eligibility and selection criteria

Submission, deadlines and time schedule

Submission

A two-step process will apply, with a mandatory submission of pre-proposals at step 1 and submission of full proposals at step two. Pre-proposals and full proposals (in English) must be submitted electronically with the Electronic Proposal Submission System (EPSS). Instructions for electronic submission will be available at http://www.biodiversa.org/2019-call in September 2019.

- The online platform will stay open 5 minutes after the official deadline. Any proposals not correctly submitted at this moment will be declared ineligible.

- All completed proposals will be submitted automatically when the platform closes, to avoid a situation where an applicant does not have time to click on the submit button. In this situation, the proposal will be evaluated as it stands.

Applicants have to submit pre-proposals: information (in English) on the project consortia, a 5-page description of the project and the required budget for each Partner must be submitted on the EPSS. Submission of pre-proposals is mandatory not possible to enter the procedure at a later stage.

The information will be used to complete an eligibility check, to help find appropriate reviewers for the evaluation of pre- and full proposals and for the evaluation of pre-proposals.

Only eligible pre-proposals can be invited to submit full proposals.

For technical questions regarding submission, please contact the Call Secretariat:

Céline Bilière: celine.biliere@agencerecherche.fr.

For technical questions regarding the EPSS, please contact the EPSS technical helpdesk:

Taavi Tiirik: epss.biodivclim@g.etag.ee.

For budgetary questions and other national/regional issues, please contact the relevant Funding organisation Contact Point - who are listed on the BiodivERsA website. Funding organisations’ rules are advertised on the BiodivERsA website and are mandatory. For any help on these, please contact the relevant national/regional Funding organisation Contact Point.

Deadlines and time schedule

The call will go through the following processes and applicants must pay attention to the deadlines outlined below in the time schedule:

June 2019:

Pre-announcement of the call

2 September 2019:

Official launch of the call

5 November 2019, 16:00 CET (local time in Brussels):

Deadline for submitting pre-proposal

November 2020

First eligibility check completed

Late January / early February 2020

1st Evaluation Committee (EvC) meeting

> Results of the 1st step communicated mid-February to the applicants

10 April 2020, 16:00 CEST (local time in Brussels):

Deadline for submitting full proposals

April 2020

Second eligibility check completed

Late June/early July 2020:

Final EvC meeting

> Ranked list of proposals established by the EvC

Mid-Late September 2020:

Recommendation for funding projects by the CSC

1 December 2020

Earliest possible start of funded projects

1 April 2021:

Latest possible start of funded projects

During the entire procedure, strict confidentiality will be maintained with respect to the identities of applicants and the contents of the proposals.

Eligibility of projects and Partners

The call is open to proposals and research consortia that meet the following criteria:

- The international, scientific research projects are performed by eligible organisations. National/regional eligibility criteria (see Funding Organisations’ rules) apply to research entities and for participation by private sector (profit and non-profit) organisations;

- The project coordinator is eligible and employed by an eligible organisation according to the terms and conditions of the participating Funding Organisation from which he/she applies for support;

- The project must be transnational project involving eligible Partners from at least three different countries participating in the call and requesting support from at least three different Participating Organisations. In addition, part of the eligible Partners, at least two must be from different EU Member States or Associated Countries [34] participating in the call. Provided the latter criterion is met (Partners from at least two different EU Member States or Associated Countries participating in the call), for proposals including Partners from outermost regions and overseas countries and territories participating in the call, if two outermost regions and overseas countries and territories are from the same country, these are counted as two participating countries (for the criteria: at least three different countries). Where a proposal includes three or more Partners from outermost regions and overseas countries and territories from the same country, these will be counted as two participating countries (for the criteria: at least three different countries).

- Proposals must be written in English.

- The scope or scale of the proposed research should exceed a single country.

- The information given in the pre-proposals is binding. No changes regarding the proposals’ content will be allowed by the CSC between the pre-proposals and full proposals. Regarding the administrative details, a limited number of changes may be allowed by the FCP and CSC, provided they are in line with the general rules of the call and the rules of the Funding Organisations:

  • Minor change of budget can be allowed by the relevant Funding Organisation . The Funding Organisation can decide according to its own rules whether it needs a justification for it. If the national/regional Funding Organisation agrees to the budget change, the project coordinator has to inform the Call Secretariat about the change with the Funding Organisation Contact Point (FCP) in copy.

  • No changes of Partners are allowed between the pre-proposals and full proposal stages, except if explicitly requested by the Funding Organisations or in case of force majeure. In both cases, a detailed justification of the changes will have to be communicated to the Call Secretariat and CSC by the project coordinator as soon as possible. Please note that the following actions are considered as changes: addition, removal or replacement of a Partner. If a researcher in charge (person) remains the same but changes the institutions, this won’t be considered as a change, provided the institution fulfils eligibility criteria. Individual cases will be examined.

Compliance with Funding Organisation eligibility criteria and rules (e.g. eligible budget items) is mandatory; it is thus strongly recommended that applicants approach their respective Funding organisation Contact Point to make sure they respect all the eligibility criteria and rules (contact list and main Funding organisations’ rules are available in the call documents published on the BiodivERsA website). If one Partner is not eligible, the whole proposal will be considered ineligible and will not be evaluated.

Project duration

The maximum project duration is 3 years.

Evaluation and selection

Potential applicants are advised to take careful note of the aims and scope of the call as described above in the Announcement of Opportunity. Applicants are strongly advised to assess the relevance of their proposed research against the thematic priorities set forth in the scientific text of the call. Any project that does not fit within the thematic priorities identified will not be recommended for funding, regardless of its quality.

Emphasis will be placed on the link between excellence and relevance to policy and practice.

Proposals from the natural, climate and social sciences are welcome.

The following evaluation procedure will apply:

1) First step:

An eligibility check of pre-proposals will be performed by the Call Secretariat and national/regional Funding organisation Contact Points (FCPs).

Eligible pre-proposals will be evaluated by an independent Evaluation Committee (EvC) composed of scientific and policy/management experts against the following criteria:

(i) fit to the scope of the call,

(ii) novelty of the research,

(iii) transnational added value.

Only successful pre-proposals will be invited to submit full proposals.

2) Second step:

An eligibility check of full proposals will be performed by the Call Secretariat and national/regional Funding organisation Contact Points.

Eligible full proposals will be evaluated by both an independent Evaluation Committee (EvC), composed of scientific and policy/management experts and external reviewers (as far as possible 3 external reviewers per proposal, 2 scientific and 1 policy/management) against the following criteria:

(i) Excellence,

(ii) Quality and efficiency of the implementation,

(iii) Impact.

The EvC will consist of experts in the natural, climate and social sciences, as well as professionals from the field of biodiversity policy and biodiversity conservation and management. It is comprised such so that it can cover, as far as possible, the range of topics within the scope of the call.

Members take part in the EvC as independent experts and do not represent any organisation nor can they send any replacements. This means that their work on this Committee does not represent any organization or nation.

At step 1: The EvC will assess the pre-proposals according to the criteria defined (see “Assessment [CB2] criteria”)

At step 2: The EvC will assess the full proposals according to the criteria defined (see “Assessment [CB3] criteria”) and moderate the assessments provided by the external reviewers.

The EvC will discuss about the proposals and establish the final ranking of pre- and full proposals based on the set of criteria defined.

After Step 1: The CSC will decide on which projects to invite to Step 2, following the eligibility check and evaluation made by the EvC.

After Step 2: The CSC will decide on which projects to recommend for funding, strictly adhering to the order of the ranking list established by the EvC.

Upon the final decision by the Funding Organisations, a list of funded projects will be published on the BiodivERsA website.

Please note that no appeal can be brought to challenge the results of the selection procedure .

(5) Funding

For this call a total amount of 20.4 [CB4] M€ has been provisionally reserved by the participating Funding Organisations.

The European Commission will also provide funding for the funded projects depending on the final total funding amount for research proposals by the participating Funding Organisations eligible for EC-funding.

The indicative total budget for this call is thus of 24.4 [CB5] M€.

Indicative budgets for each Funding Organisation are given below. Each participant in a funded project will be preferentially funded by his or her national/regional Funding Organisation(s) participating in the call. The additional funding provided by the EC for the funded project will be distributed through the H2020-eligible national/regional Funding Organisations.

Upon the final decision by the Funding Organisations, a list of funded projects will be published on the BiodivERsA website.

PROVISIONAL LIST OF PARTICIPATING ORGANISATIONS WITH COMMITMENTS

Country

Funding organisation

Indicative budget (low)

(EURO)

Indicative budget (high)

(EURO)

Austria

FWF

800 000

800 000

Belgium

BelSPO#

500 000

500 000

Belgium

F.R.S.-FNRS#

200 000

200 000

Belgium

FWO#

700 000

700 000

Brazil

CONFAP#

Tbc

Tbc

Brazil

FAPESP#

400 000

400 000

Bulgaria

BNSF#

300 000

300 000

Czech Republic

TACR#

1 640 000

1 640 000

Denmark

IFD

1 000 000

1 000 000

Estonia

ETAG#

100 000

100 000

Finland

AKA

850 000

850 000

France

ANR#

2 000 000

2 000 000

France

GUA-REG#

100 000

100 000

France

REU-REG#

200 000

200 000

Germany

DFG

1 500 000

1 500 000

Germany

DLR-PT

2 000 000

2 000 000

Greece

GSRT#

750 000

750 000

Ireland

EPA#

650 000

650 000

Israel

MoEP#

100 000

100 000

Latvia

VIAA#

400 000

400 000

Lithuania

RCL#

100 000

100 000

Norway

RCN#

1 000 000

1 000 000

Poland

NCN

500 000

500 000

Portugal

FCT#

100 000

100 000

Portugal

FRCT#

100 000

100 000

Romania

UEFISCDI#

500 000

500 000

Slovakia

SAS#

240 000

240 000

South Africa

DST#

150 000

150 000

Spain

AEI#

700 000

700 000

Spain

GOBCAN#

200 000

200 000

Sweden

Formas#

1 500 000

1 500 000

Switzerland

SNSF

CHF 2 000 000

CHF 2 000 000

Tunisia

MHESR#

Tbc

Tbc

Turkey

TAGEM#

200 000

200 000

* The Funding Organisations marked by “#” have defined maximum allowed budget per project and/or per Partner. Please consult the Funding Organisations’ rules and contact your Funding organisation Contact Point for more information.

Please note that all Funding Organisations have defined specific rules (read carefully the Funding Organisations’ rules and contact your Funding organisation Contact Point in case of any questions or doubts regarding these rules).

(6) Programme structure and management

Programme activities

The funded projects are considered to form part of an international research programme for which joint activities will be organized, in particular:

- a kick-off meeting at the beginning of the funding period, to be organised back-to-back with a data management workshop and a clustering workshop, and

- a final meeting to present and disseminate the project results at the end of the funding period, to be organised back-to back with a foresight workshop.

At least the Coordinator of each funded consortium should participate in these joint activities. The cost for attendance to joint activities should be included in the budgets of the proposals .

Project management and reporting

Funded projects will be required to submit a mid-term report and a final report progress. Some Funding Organisations may request additional specific reports.

(7) Eligible budget items

Eligible costs and the maximum allowed requested budget per project and/or per Partner are governed by Funding Organisations’ specific rules. Specific questions should be addressed to the Funding organisation Contact Points (updated list available on the BiodivERsA website)

In case of a significant financial pressure on a Funding Organisation due to the high number of teams from its country/region in the submitted applications, the applicants may be asked to adjust downward their budget.

(8) Further information

The Call Secretariat, ensured by ANR, is responsible for organizing the procedure and for all communication with applicants related to joint aspects of the call and procedure.

However, for national/regional Funding Organisation eligibility criteria, the Funding Organisations’ documented rules must be consulted and Funding organisation Contact Points should be approached (both lists are available in the call documents published on the BiodivERsA website), in particular with regard to eligibility of research Partner, eligible costs and other country-specific aspects of the call. The compliance with Funding organisations’ rules is mandatory, and relevant Funding organisation Contact Points should be contacted to obtain further information if needed.

According to their respective rules, the Funding Organisations may require that the project members selected for funding establish a project consortium agreement. The requirement will thus apply to all the project members, even if their respective Funding Organisation does not require a project consortium agreement.

We draw the attention of the applicants to the fact that if they plan to use genetic resources and traditional knowledge associated with genetic resources in their project, they will have to ascertain towards the competent authorities and focal point that these used genetic resources and traditional knowledge associated with genetic resources have been accessed in accordance with applicable access and benefit-sharing legislation or regulatory requirements, and that benefits are fairly and equitably shared upon mutually agreed terms, in accordance with any applicable legislation or regulatory requirements. [35] Please refer to the competent authorities for more information.

Annex 2: Funding model (volta ao índice)

The Participating Organisations agree on launching a joint call and using a joint evaluation with national and regional funding and additional EC co-funding. In principle, each Funding Organisation will fund its own national/regional scientific teams (i.e. following the ‘juste retour’ model); yet using different levels of flexibility depending on their national/regional rules, they might fund foreign teams.

The EC-eligible Participating Organisations agree to use the EC contribution for research as a “mix-mode” funding model composed of

- 80% pro rata actual spent pot”), i.e. 80% of the EC contribution to support research will be allocated pro rata their respective actual contributions

- 20% "flexibility" common pot (“real common pot”), i.e. 20% of the EC contribution will be put into a "flexibility" common pot that will be used to close the gaps of funding within the ranking list. National/regional Funding Organisations first have to fulfil their commitments indicated as Indicative budget (low) (see table below) before they are allowed to get money from the common pot.

The Call Steering Committee reserves the right to adjust the redistribution of EC funding between a virtual (pro-rata) and real common pot during the funding meeting, where agreed by the Funding Organisations eligible to EC funding.

Participating Organisations are aiming to fund as many of the highest ranked proposals as possible. Funding gaps may arise in the ranking when one of the Participating Organisations runs out of money. Participating Organisations intend to deal with these gaps through the following level of flexibility:

- A Funding Organisation does not have to spend all the money that has been provisionally reserved, if the funding requests by its researchers is lower than its reserved budget;

- In order to avoid early funding gaps, each Participating Organisation is asked to match as accurately and realistically as possible the financial demand from their respective research communities with the budget earmarked for the call. It means that all solutions to unblock situations at the national/regional level will be explored, such as:

o Some Funding Organisations may be able to come up with extra money to fund good proposals;

o Some Funding Organisations may ask the applicants to reduce realistically their requested contribution and/or may add maximum threshold values for budget requested from the Funding Organisation per proposal or per team in the Funding Organisation eligibility rules;

o Some Funding Organisations may be able to fund foreign teams;

o Some Funding Organisations may be able to fund foreign teams via subcontracting.

These different levels of flexibility will be explored (i) before the launch of the call, (ii) after the first evaluation step, and (iii) after the final evaluation of the proposals.

Funding particularities [36]

Some Funding Organisations have defined specific rules. These rules will be detailed in the annexes dedicated to each Funding Organisation’s national eligibility and funding rules.

Table: Anticipated national/regional funding commitments to the call

The budget reserved to the call by the National/Regional Funding organisations is listed below:

Country

Funding organisation

Indicative budget (low)

(EURO)

Indicative budget (high)

(EURO)

Austria

FWF

800 000

800 000

Belgium

BelSPO#

500 000

500 000

Belgium

F.R.S.-FNRS#

200 000

200 000

Belgium

FWO#

700 000

700 000

Brazil

CONFAP#

Tbc

Tbc

Brazil

FAPESP#

400 000

400 000

Bulgaria

BNSF#

300 000

300 000

Czech Republic

TACR#

1 640 000

1 640 000

Denmark

IFD

1 000 000

1 000 000

Estonia

ETAG#

100 000

100 000

Finland

AKA

850 000

850 000

France

ANR#

2 000 000

2 000 000

France

GUA-REG#

100 000

100 000

France

REU-REG#

200 000

200 000

Germany

DFG

1 500 000

1 500 000

Germany

DLR-PT

2 000 000

2 000 000

Greece

GSRT#

750 000

750 000

Ireland

EPA#

650 000

650 000

Israel

MoEP#

100 000

100 000

Latvia

VIAA#

400 000

400 000

Lithuania

RCL#

100 000

100 000

Norway

RCN#

1 000 000

1 000 000

Poland

NCN

500 000

500 000

Portugal

FCT#

100 000

100 000

Portugal

FRCT#

100 000

100 000

Romania

UEFISCDI#

500 000

500 000

Slovakia

SAS#

240 000

240 000

South Africa

DST#

150 000

150 000

Spain

AEI#

700 000

700 000

Spain

GOBCAN#

200 000

200 000

Sweden

Formas#

1 500 000

1 500 000

Switzerland

SNSF

CHF 2 000 000

CHF 2 000 000

Tunisia

MHESR#

Tbc

Tbc

Turkey

TAGEM#

200 000

200 000

Due to a possible high financial pressure, several agencies have defined a maximum request per project and/or per Partner for their national/regional teams. These agencies are marked by “#” in the above table.

Failure to honour funding commitment and fall-back procedure

National/regional organisation’s procedures for joint programme funding will be made explicit to the Call Secretariat and CSC in order to avoid any unexpected delays or issues. Each Participating Organisation will be asked to confirm – by signing the present MoU – that it accepts a joint evaluation procedure.

However, in the implementation of joint calls, it can happen that a Participating Organisation will fail to honour its commitment to fund research teams in the selected projects, due to force majeure. In case of failure from a Participating Organisation, there will not be any judicial proceedings, except if this results from gross negligence or deliberate malevolence.

If a Participating Organisation cannot confirm the funding of its research teams four months after the CSC made its decision on funding recommendation, a procedure for re-evaluation will be launched. The proposal will be reviewed without the considered research teams and re-assessed. The exact process of the re-evaluation procedure will be decided by the CSC.

Call management budget

The costs related to the call management (evaluation procedure, incl. fees for EvC members, travel and accommodation costs for EvC members; travel and accommodation costs for the independent observer, costs of the EPSS, etc.) are not eligible to EC. However, the Participating Organisations have chosen to use part of the EC contribution to support their activities, agreeing that the corresponding costs cannot be declared as eligible and that the EC contribution will not exceed 33% of Participating Organisations’ funding of transnational projects. This means in practice that EC-eligible Participating Organisations agree to replace any EC contribution that is used to support their activities with additional national/regional contributions to the funding of transnational projects.

Annex 3: Pre-proposal application form (volta ao índice)

This template is an indicative model of pre-proposal application form. All pre-proposals have to be submitted online via the electronic proposal submission system (EPSS). The format of the pre-proposal application form will be modified to fit the EPSS.

PRE-PROPOSAL APPLICATION FORM

Call for transnational research projects on “Biodiversity and Climate Change”

Project title*

Short name / Acronym*

* Please note that the project title and acronym should be considered as definitive

Keywords:

Indicate the overall requested consortium budget (in €):

General guidance for all applicants:

· the proposal must be written in English;

· the different sections of the application should not exceed the prescribed maximum space;

· any documents other than those requested as part of the proposal will not be forwarded to Evaluation Committee members.

I. Administrative details

NB : This part will have to be filled in directly in the EPSS.

You will have to provide in this section information on the coordinator and Partners involved, as well as the requested budget per Partner.

What is a Partner?

Note that depending on the Funding Organisation, a “Partner” can be:

a researcher,

an institution,

a laboratory, a department of an institution.

Please make sure to respect the eligibility rules of the call.

Please also consult national/regional Funding Organisations’ rules advertised on the BiodivERsA website, which are compulsory . Applicants are strongly advised to contact their corresponding Funding Organisations (list available on the BiodivERsA website) and to confirm their eligibility with their Funding Organisations before submitting the pre-proposal.

Please note that no changes of Partners will be allowed between pre-proposal and full proposal stage, except if explicitly requested by the Funding Organisations. Please note that the following actions are considered as changes: addition, removal or replacement of a Partner (person). If a researcher in charge (person) remains the same but changes the institutions, this won’t be considered as a change, provided the institution fulfils eligibility criteria. Individual cases will be examined.

Please note that if a researcher in charge is the same for several Partners within one Project (e.g. case of a scientist affiliated to several laboratories in different countries), it cannot request funding from several Funding Organisations (i.e. it will have to choose one Funding Organisation to which it requests funding) and won’t be counted as two different Partners.

ACCESS AND BENEFIT SHARING

Please note that if you plan to use genetic resources and traditional knowledge associated with genetic resources in your project, you will have to ascertain towards the competent authorities and focal point that these used genetic resources and traditional knowledge associated with genetic resources have been accessed in accordance with applicable access and benefit-sharing legislation or regulatory requirements, and that benefits are fairly and equitably shared upon mutually agreed terms, in accordance with any applicable legislation or regulatory requirements [37] .

Please also note that if the utilization of genetic resources or traditional knowledge associated with genetic resources takes place in an EU Member State, users in those states will have to comply with the general due diligence obligation under Art. 4 of Regulation (EU) No 511/2014, as well as the obligation to file due diligence declarations under Art. 7 of Regulation (EU) No 511/2014 [38] .

For funding, there are 3 categories of Partners:

1. Partners from countries (and organisations) eligible for direct funding (designated Partners 1, 2… N)

2. Partners from countries (and organisations) ineligible for direct funding, but subcontracted by a Partner 1, 2…N (designated Partners 1a, 2a… Na) (e.g. Partner 1a is subcontracted by Partner 1)

3. Fully self-financed Partners from any country who bring their own secured budget. (designated Partner A, B)

Coordinator – Partner 1

Researcher in charge:

ORCID id.

Family name

First name

Title

Gender

Phone

E-mail

Web site

Research organisation / Company

Status: Private or public?

Division / Department / Unit or Laboratory

Street name and number

PO Box

Postal code

Cedex

Town

Country

Employment status information

on permanent position

on fixed-term position

If on fixed term position:

Duration of contract:

Funding body:

Other team members involved in the project

Team member 1: Family name, First name, gender, title, phone, email, ORCID id.

Team member 2: Family name, First name, gender, title, phone, email, ORCID id.

Team member N : Family name, First name, gender, title, phone, email, ORCID id.

Requested total budget of Partner 1 (in €)

Partner 1a (Subcontracted)

Researcher in charge:

ORCID ID:

Family name

First name

Title

Gender

Phone

E-mail

Web site

Research organisation / Company

Status: Private or public?

Division / Department / Unit or Laboratory

Street name and number

PO Box

Postal code

Cedex

Town

Country

Other team members involved in the project

Team member 1: Family name, First name, gender, title, phone, email, ORCID id.

Team member 2: Family name, First name, gender, title, phone, email, ORCID id.

Team member N : Family name, First name, gender, title, phone, email, ORCID id.

Please insert as many copies of the above table as necessary for other Partners 1b, 1c

Partner 2

Researcher in charge:

ORCID id.

Family name

First name

Title

Gender

Phone

E-mail

Web site

Research organisation / Company

Status: Private or public?

Division / Department / Unit or Laboratory

Street name and number

PO Box

Postal code

Cedex

Town

Country

Employment status information

on permanent position

on fixed-term position

If on fixed term position

Duration of contract:

Funding body:

Other team members involved in the project

Team member 1: Family name, First name, gender, title, phone, email, ORCID id.

Team member 2: Family name, First name, gender, title, phone, email, ORCID id.

Team member N : Family name, First name, gender, title, phone, email, ORCID id.

Requested total budget of Partner 2 (in €)

Partner 2a (Subcontracted)

Researcher in charge:

ORCID ID:

Family name

First name

Title

Gender

Phone

E-mail

Web site

Research organisation / Company

Status: Private or public?

Division / Department / Unit or Laboratory

Street name and number

PO Box

Postal code

Cedex

Town

Country

Other team members involved in the project

Team member 1: Family name, First name, gender, title, phone, email, ORCID id.

Team member 2: Family name, First name, gender, title, phone, email, ORCID id.

Team member N : Family name, First name, gender, title, phone, email, ORCID id.

Please insert as many copies of the above table as necessary for other Partners 2b, 2c…

Partner 3

Researcher in charge:

ORCID ID:

Family name

First name

Title

Gender

Phone

E-mail

Web site

Research organisation / Company

Status: Private or public?

Division / Department / Unit or Laboratory

Street name and number

PO Box

Postal code

Cedex

Town

Country

Employment status information

on permanent position

on fixed-term position

If on fixed term position

Duration of contract:

Funding body:

Other team members involved in the project

Team member 1: Family name, First name, gender, title, phone, email, ORCID id.

Team member 2: Family name, First name, gender, title, phone, email, ORCID id.

Team member N : Family name, First name, gender, title, phone, email, ORCID id.

Requested total budget of Partner 3 (in €)

Partner N

Researcher in charge:

ORCID ID:

Family name

First name

Title

Gender

Phone

E-mail

Web site

Research organisation / Company

Status: Private or public?

Division / Department / Unit or Laboratory

Street name and number

PO Box

Postal code

Cedex

Town

Country

Employment status information

on permanent position

on fixed-term position

If on fixed term position

Duration of contract:

Funding body:

Other team members involved in the project

Team member 1: Family name, First name, gender, title, phone, email, ORCID id.

Team member 2: Family name, First name, gender, title, phone, email, ORCID id.

Team member N : Family name, First name, gender, title, phone, email, ORCID id.

Requested total budget of Partner N (in €)

Please insert as many copies of the above table as necessary for other applicants

Self-financed Partner A

Researcher in charge:

ORCID ID:

Family name

First name

Title

Gender

Phone

E-mail

Web site

Research organisation / Company

Status: Private or public?

Division / Department / Unit or Laboratory

Street name and number

PO Box

Postal code

Cedex

Town

Country

Other team members involved in the project

Team member 1: Family name, First name, gender, title, phone, email, ORCID id.

Team member N: Family name, First name, gender, title, phone, email

Please insert as many copies of the above table as necessary for other Partners B, C…

II. Abstract

(max 3,000 characters including spaces)

NB : This part will have to be filled in directly in the EPSS.

Theme(s), environment(s) and/or socio-economic sector(s) targeted if relevant, scientific discipline(s) involved and study area(s)/country(ies) covered in the project

Please indicate the theme addressed by your project, and the type of environment(s) that are studied in your project (please tick the yes/no box – if more than one theme and/or one type of ecosystem is addressed in your project, please use the percentage box), and list the socio-economic sectors, the scientific disciplines involved and the study areas/countries covered by the project.

Themes in the joint 2019-2020 BiodivERsA call

YES

%

NO

T1: Consequences of climate change on biodiversity and nature’s contributions to people

T2: Climate-biodiversity feedback processes

T3: Potential of nature-based solutions for mitigating and adapting to climate change

T4: Synergies and trade-offs between policies on biodiversity, climate and other relevant sectors, and the role of agents of change

Environment(s) studied if relevant

YES

%

NO

1. Terrestrial

2. Inland water

3. Coastal

4. Marine

5. Other: … [to be specified]

Socio-economic sector(s) studied if relevant

(max 3,500 characters including spaces)

Scientific disciplines involved

To be selected from a standardised list (available on the EPSS)

Study areas/countries covered by the project (please do not indicate here the nationality of the members of the consortium but the areas and countries studied in your proposals (research scope, studied sites, etc.)

(max 3,500 characters including spaces)

III. Short project description

(max. 5 pages – including title and citations –, Arial font, 11pts, single spaced, margins of 1.27 cm

Footnotes are allowed, if you respect the above mentioned layout criteria. Hyperlink are not allowed).

NB : This part will have to be upload as a single pdf on the EPSS.

The project description should include the following elements:

- Scientific objectives and main research questions;

- A short description of the hypothesis and theories;

- Explanation of the novelty of the research planned, in relation to the present state-of-the-art.

- Research plan: brief description of the methodologies and work planned;

- Relevance for policy and/or society, and importance of the research for solving pressing issues related to biodiversity; this can include elements indicating how stakeholder engagement and results dissemination are envisaged. [39]

- Fit to the call and thematic priorities;

- Transnational added value of the research proposed.

IV. Brief CVs for the principal investigator of each Partner involved in the project

NB : This part will have to be filled in directly in the EPSS, using the CV template below.

Please include the CVs of self-financed and sub-contracted Partners.

Participation status: <Coordinator, PI or WP leader>

Name :

Nationality :

Institution, City, Country :

E-mail :

URL / website of the researcher (including complete list of publications):

Professional status : <Professor, Assistant professor, Associate professor, Senior scientist, Post-Doc, PhD-student, other>

Education

<Year; type of education >

<Year ; type of education >

Academic Positions

<Year; Position>

<Year; Position>

Awards received / other responsibilities

General expertise and its relevance for the project (max 1,000 characters including spaces)

Up to 5 most important publications relevant to the proposal over 2015-2019

<…>

<…>

<…>

<…>

<…>

V. Exclusion of potential reviewers (optional)

NB : This part will have to be filled in directly in the EPSS.

List here potential reviewers who, you think, should not be asked to evaluate the project for reasons of direct competition and partiality (Table V.a). Also provide the names of significant collaborators that should not be used as reviewers due to conflicts of interest (Table V.b).

V.a. Potential competitors

First Name

Last Name

Organisation

Country

E-mail address

Rationale for excluding the reviewer

1

2

3

N

Insert as many lines as needed

V.b. Collaborators with conflict of interest

First Name

Last Name

Organisation

Country

E-mail address

Rationale for excluding the reviewer

1

2

3

N

Insert as many lines as needed

VI. Suggestion of potential reviewers (optional)

Please indicate up to 4 experts who could review your proposal, including their field expertise. The rules on conflict of interest set forth in Annex 10 apply to these suggestions.

NB : This part will have to be filled in directly in the EPSS.

First Name

Last Name

Organisation

Country

E-mail address

Link to his/her website

Field of expertise

1

2

3

4

For point Va and VI: Please note that these are only suggestions for consideration by the Evaluation Committee (EvC) and Call Steering Committee (CSC). The final attribution of reviewers to proposals is the responsibility of the EvC and CSC.

VII. Budget

NB : This part will have to be filled in directly in the EPSS.

Please indicate in this table the budget requested from this 2019-2020 BiodivERsA call, as well as an indicative repartition between the following categories of costs: permanent salaries, non-permanent salaries and others.

!! Please note that you should indicate in this table only the requested budget (the budget you will request to your Funding Organisation) and not the total budget / total costs of the project. Please make sure to follow your Funding Organisations’ rules. !!

MANDATORY COSTS:

The funded projects are considered to form part of an international research programme for which activities will be organised, namely a kick-off meeting (organised back-to-back with a data management workshop and a clustering workshop) and a final meeting (organised back-to-back with a foresight workshop). At least the coordinators of funded projects should participate in these joint activities. The cost for attendance to these meetings must be included in the budgets of the full proposals. Given the intercontinental collaborations expected under this call, it is recommended that proposals reserve a total of approximately 3,000 euro for the attendance to these two meetings.

The indicated requested budget per Partner should be considered definitive, unless adjustment is requested by the national/regional Funding Organisations. Between pre-proposal and full proposal stage, only minor change of budget can be allowed by the relevant Funding Organisation provided they are in line with the general rules of the call and the rules of the Funding Organisations. The Funding Organisation can decide according to its own rules whether it needs a justification.

(Please insert as many lines in the table below as necessary for other Partners)

Funding organisation(s)* that should fund the research of this Partner

Permanent salaries

(k€)**

Non-permanent salaries (k€)

Fellowships (k€)**

Other costs (k€)

Subcontracting costs (k€)**

Overheads (k€)**

Total requested budget (k€)

Partner 1

(name and country)

Partner 1 a

(name and country)

Partner 2

(name and country)

Partner 3

(name and country)

Self-financed Partner A

/

0 (the Partner will be funded through XX***)

0

0

0

0

0

0

* If more than one Funding Organisation from your country is participating in the call, please indicate which one should fund your project (it may be possible to indicate all of them). If you are eligible for funding from different funding organization within one country, and if budget calculations (e.g. for non-permanent salaries or overheads) differ between the Funding Organisations of a same country, please insert the higher amount in each cell.

** Only if fundable by Funding Organisations

*** For self-financed Partners, please indicate how their participation to the project will be funded.

VIII. Signature & use of data

The data provided in this pre-proposal application form will be used for the purpose of the evaluation procedure and for the production of statistics on this call only. Anonymity and confidentiality will be maintained throughout processing of these data for the production of statistics. Please note that these data will be accessible to Funding agencies participating to the call, including the ones based in non-EU-countries (i.e. Brazil, Israel, Norway, South Africa, Switzerland, Tunisia and Turkey).

ˆ By ticking this box, applicants give their consent for the collection and use of their data, as well as for the transfer of their data to non-EU countries mentioned above for the purpose of the evaluation procedure and the production of anonymous statistics on the call only.

Annex 4: Full Proposal application form (volta ao índice)

This template is an indicative model of full proposal application form. All proposals have to be submitted online via the electronic proposal submission system (EPSS). The format of the full proposal application form will be modified to fit the EPSS.

FULL PROPOSAL APPLICATION FORM

Call for transnational research projects on “Biodiversity and Climate Change”

Project title*

Short name / Acronym*

Keywords:

Duration of the project*:

DD/MM/YYYY - DD/MM/YYYY

* Please note that the maximum duration is 3 years.

General guidance for all applicants:

· the proposal must be written in English;

· the different sections of the application should not exceed the prescribed maximum space;

· any documents other than those requested as part of the proposal will not be forwarded to External Reviewers or EvC Members.

I.A. Administrative details

NB : This part will have to be filled in directly in the EPSS.

You will have to provide in this section information on the coordinator and Partners involved, time to be dedicated per Partner to the project and declare if you have submitted this proposal to other funding programmes in parallel.

What is a Partner?

Note that depending on the Funding Organisation, a “Partner” can be:

a researcher,

an institution,

a laboratory, a department of an institution.

Please make sure to respect the eligibility rules of the call.

Please also consult national/regional Funding Organisations’ rules advertised on the BiodivERsA website, which are compulsory . Applicants are strongly advised to contact their corresponding Funding Organisations (list available on the BiodivERsA website) and to confirm their eligibility with their Funding Organisations before submitting the pre-proposal.

Please note that no changes of Partners will be allowed between pre-proposal and full proposal stage, except if explicitly requested by the Funding Organisations. Please note that the following actions are considered as changes: addition, removal or replacement of a Partner (person). If a researcher in charge (person) remains the same but changes the institutions, this won’t be considered as a change, provided the institution fulfils eligibility criteria. Individual cases will be examined.

Please note that if a researcher in charge is the same for several Partners within one Project (e.g. case of a scientist affiliated to several laboratories in different countries), it cannot request funding from several Funding Organisations (i.e. it will have to choose one Funding Organisation to which it requests funding) and won’t be counted as two different Partners.

ACCESS AND BENEFIT SHARING

Please note that if you plan to use genetic resources and traditional knowledge associated with genetic resources in your project, you will have to ascertain towards the competent authorities and focal point that these used genetic resources and traditional knowledge associated with genetic resources have been accessed in accordance with applicable access and benefit-sharing legislation or regulatory requirements, and that benefits are fairly and equitably shared upon mutually agreed terms, in accordance with any applicable legislation or regulatory requirements [40] .

Please also note that if the utilization of genetic resources or traditional knowledge associated with genetic resources takes place in an EU Member State, users in those states will have to comply with the general due diligence obligation under Art. 4 of Regulation (EU) No 511/2014, as well as the obligation to file due diligence declarations under Art. 7 of Regulation (EU) No 511/2014 [41] .

For funding, there are 3 categories of Partners:

1. Partners from countries (and organisations) eligible for direct funding (designated Partners 1, 2… N)

2. Partners from countries (and organisations) ineligible for direct funding, but subcontracted by a Partner 1, 2…N (designated Partners 1a, 2a… Na) (e.g. Partner 1a is subcontracted by Partner 1)

3. Fully self-financed Partners from any country who bring their own secured budget. (designated Partner A, B).

Coordinator – Partner 1

Researcher in charge:

ORCID ID:

Family name

First name

Title

Gender

Phone

E-mail

Web site

Research organisation / Company

Status: Private or public?

Division / Department / Unit or Laboratory

Street name and number

PO Box

Postal code

Cedex

Town

Country

Employment status information

on permanent position

on fixed-term position

If on fixed term position

Duration of contract:

Funding body:

Other team members involved in the project

Team member 1 : Family name, First name, gender, title, phone, email, ORCID id.

Team member 2 : Family name, First name, gender, title, phone, email, ORCID id.

Team member N : Family name, First name, gender, title, phone, email, ORCID id.

Partner 1a (Subcontracted)

Researcher in charge:

ORCID ID:

Family name

First name

Title

Gender

Phone

E-mail

Web site

Research organisation / Company

Status: Private or public?

Division / Department / Unit or Laboratory

Street name and number

PO Box

Postal code

Cedex

Town

Country

Team members involved in the project (when the Partner is an institution, a laboratory, a department)

Team member 1 : Family name, First name, gender, title, phone, email

Team member 2 : Family name, First name, gender, title, phone, email

Team member N : Family name, First name, gender, title, phone, email

Please insert as many copies of the above table as necessary for other Partners 1b, 1c

Partner 2

Researcher in charge:

ORCID ID:

Family name

First name

Title

Gender

Phone

E-mail

Web site

Research organisation / Company

Status: Private or public?

Division / Department / Unit or Laboratory

Street name and number

PO Box

Postal code

Cedex

Town

Country

Employment status information

on permanent position

on fixed-term position

If on fixed term position

Duration of contract:

Funding body:

Other team members involved in the project

Team member 1 : Family name, First name, gender, title, phone, email, ORCID id.

Team member 2 : Family name, First name, gender, title, phone, email, ORCID id.

Team member N : Family name, First name, gender, title, phone, email, ORCID id.

Partner 2a (Subcontracted)

Researcher in charge:

ORCID ID:

Family name

First name

Title

Gender

Phone

E-mail

Web site

Research organisation / Company

Status: Private or public?

Division / Department / Unit or Laboratory

Street name and number

PO Box

Postal code

Cedex

Town

Country

Other team members involved in the project

Team member 1 : Family name, First name, gender, title, phone, email, ORCID id.

Team member 2 : Family name, First name, gender, title, phone, email, ORCID id.

Team member N : Family name, First name, gender, title, phone, email, ORCID id.

Please insert as many copies of the above table as necessary for other Partners 2b, 2c…

Partner 3

Researcher in charge:

ORCID ID:

Family name

First name

Title

Gender

Phone

E-mail

Web site

Research organisation / Company

Status: Private or public?

Division / Department / Unit or Laboratory

Street name and number

PO Box

Postal code

Cedex

Town

Country

Employment status information

on permanent position

on fixed-term position

If on fixed term position

Duration of contract:

Funding body:

Other team members involved in the project

Team member 1 : Family name, First name, gender, title, phone, email

Team member 2 : Family name, First name, gender, title, phone, email

Team member N : Family name, First name, gender, title, phone, email